sandandglass:

Jon Stewart and Matt Taibbi discuss the different treatment afforded to ‘street’ and white-collar criminals. 

(via breanieswordvomit)


Photo by Peter Yang

Photo by Peter Yang

(Source: massappeal, via brain-food)

archiemcphee:

According to this sign, which was found on Hawthorne Blvd and photographed by Redditor wetasaneagle, there’s a Dinosaur Roar Contest currently taking place in Portland, OR. Time to start practicing our dino roars!
[via signonpdx]

archiemcphee:

According to this sign, which was found on Hawthorne Blvd and photographed by Redditor wetasaneagle, there’s a Dinosaur Roar Contest currently taking place in Portland, OR. Time to start practicing our dino roars!

[via signonpdx]

(via wilwheaton)

(Source: sandandglass, via silas216)

bloodphoenix:

miucciapet:

damn she thick

Is it twerking?

(Source: ultravioletmoon, via saintpattysblog)

"Sub-Biosphere 2 is a closed, self-sustaining underwater habitat designed as a base for aquanauts, tourists and for studying oceanographic life science. The design was inspired by Phil’s love of diving, his childhood fascination with Jacques Cousteau and Ian Koblick, and studying the original Biosphere 2 scientific research facility in Arizona as a student.

Underwater human habitation is an idea that’s been around forever. NASA astronauts already do sub-sea mission training, and closed-system environments such as advanced submarines and the International Space Station are already very well-developed.

The structure would play a role as a ‘global seed bank’, storing and sustaining human, plant and animal life. Sub-Biosphere 2 would offer a long-term habitat for around 100 people – the minimum number that would be required to rebuild our species in the event of a catastrophic man-made or natural disaster. Land-based events have wreaked havoc on life on Earth before, in the case of the dinosaurs and in more localised events such as supervolcanic eruptions and pandemics. If we cannot avoid a runaway greenhouse effect, it may be that we may be safer living underneath the sea in the long-term.

The structure has integrated systems to supply and manage air, food, fresh water and electricity. While the central biome monitors life-support systems, humans, plants and animals would live and interact around the eight surrounding domes. These biomes recreate Earth’s biosphere – the regions of the land, sea and air which hold life, known as the lithosphere, hydrosphere and atmosphere respectively.

Each biome recreates a different climactic zone on Earth, exchanging water and air flow between each other, mimicking the way in which Earth’s climates interlink. Zones would include the North Frigid Zone (the Arctic), North Temperate Zone, Torrid Zone, South Temperate Zone and the South Frigid Zone (the Antarctic).

To raise public awareness, the Sub-Biosphere 2 is a central feature of a young adult sci-fi novel, Moral Order, created by Phil Pauley and due to be published later this year. The book has been best described as Harry Potter meets Star Trek. The underwater biosphere is part of a vision of the future in which the remaining citizens of a climate change-ravaged Earth are seeking salvation beneath the sea. The novel will be the first element of what is hoped to be a multimedia franchise designed to ignite the interest of a global audience in sustainability and climate change. Beyond raising awareness, a further aim of the franchise is to raise funds to demonstrate the first Sub-Biosphere 2 research facility.”

CONCEPT DESIGN BY PHIL PAULEY

(via we-are-star-stuff)

blackfishsound:

Amazing capture! via Aboriginal Journeys - Whale Watching & Grizzly Bear Tours. According to a commenter, the orca that were observed on this trip were the T123’s and 002C’s transient orcas, off northern Vancouver Island.

(via earthandanimals)

policymic:

Cleveland baseball fans stand against racism by #DeChiefing their gear

In the past few months, debate surrounding the use of racial caricatures as pro sports mascots has reached a fever pitch. Just ask the Washington Redskins, who’ve endured significant backlash for both their refusal to change their name and their half-assed attempts to placate their critics.

But a few miles west, fans of the MLB’s Cleveland Indians are taking a stand. In a motion of solidarity, a small but growing number have been “de-Chiefing” their paraphernalia by removing the offensive “Chief Wahoo” mascot from caps and jerseys that bear its likeness.

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(via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)